Ashi Acupuncture – Education and Training https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com Acupuncture and dry needling information, training and education. Medical based acupuncture with an emphasis on anatomy and technique. Thu, 19 Dec 2019 04:13:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.2 https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/cropped-logo_650-2-32x32.jpg Ashi Acupuncture – Education and Training https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com 32 32 Acupuncture Treatment Room Essentials and Making Sure Patients Don’t Feel Abandoned With Needles in Them https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/acupuncture-treatment-room-essentials-and-making-sure-patients-dont-feel-abandoned-with-needles-in-them/ https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/acupuncture-treatment-room-essentials-and-making-sure-patients-dont-feel-abandoned-with-needles-in-them/#comments Mon, 02 Apr 2018 19:40:33 +0000 https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/?p=1393

#1 Doorbell

I practice in a small town and the majority of patients I see have never had acupuncture before. But even within this small minority of patients who have had acupuncture before, I have heard many, many times how they were left trapped and uncomfortable by another acupuncturist. It is the number one complaint I’ve heard about other acupuncturists. And it is so easy to fix.

Always give your patients a way to alert you if they are left alone. Wireless doorbells are perfect for this. They are relatively cheap and easy to find at hardware stores or big box retailers like Walmart or Homedepot. Most come with 2 transmitters. Ideally you would like a transmitter for each treatment room and assign a unique chime for each room. This way you’ll know which room needs you.

Most commonly my patients use these when they are under a TDP lamp and it becomes too hot. But I never leave them alone without one.

I have a much more basic unit, but this one from Amazon looks like my next purchase.

Check It Out On Amazon

#2 Drapes

Custom sized sheets; I have them in 2 sizes. A large size (approximately 30″x50″) to cover the treatment table in the area of their torso and/or head and a smaller size (approximately 30″x25″) to cover bolsters that go under the patient’s knees or feet and to cover their buttocks or groin when needed. So much more comfortable than paper covers and easier to change between patients and launder than fitted treatment table sheets.

You can buy fabric and cut and hem to size or start with regular bed sheets and cut and hem. Make a lot of them because you will average 2 per treatment.

acupuncture table drapes

#3 Cough Drops

Two main uses; for coughing/dry throat patients or for patients suffering needle shock that could benefit from a little boost to their blood sugar (see my report on needle shock for more info). Sometimes you can find them with Chinese herbs in them!

Check It Out On Amazon

#4 Timer

I have one of these for each treatment room and mainly use them to keep track of electro-acupuncture or heat lamp times. I buy them at the “Dollar Store” for, you guessed it, a dollar. Walmart has them cheap too. Have you ever forgotten about a patient? Don’t.

#5 Tissues

I use these mainly when I am removing needles, but patients ask for them occasionally too. I get a nice decorative wood cover. Here’s a bamboo one to give you an idea.

 

Check It Out On Amazon

#6 Hairclips

I use a lot of moxa to perform wen zhen (温针 warm needle therapy). It gets tricky working around the hairline. Hairclips help with that.

Hope these ideas help your practice. Do you have ideas to share? Please leave a comment below.

 

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Acupuncture Training: Lucy Whyte Ferguson on Treating the Shoulder https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/acupuncture-training-lucy-whyte-ferguson-on-treating-the-shoulder/ https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/acupuncture-training-lucy-whyte-ferguson-on-treating-the-shoulder/#respond Tue, 08 Mar 2016 06:25:06 +0000 https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/?p=1230

Author and trigger point expert Lucy Whyte Ferguson D.C. shares her insights into treating frozen shoulder.

About the Guest

Dr. Ferguson has studied and collaborated with many of the icons of trigger point therapy. She refers to herself as the “Forest Gump” of chiropractic because of her luck in being in the right place at the right time. She was treated by Leroy Perry, a chiropractor who worked with Olympic athletes when she injured her back in 1975 and then went to work with him and John Thie, the chiropractor who wrote the Touch for Health book and helped lay people learn how to use acupressure for muscle balancing.  Later she was invited to a seminar with Janet Travell, M.D. Dr. Travell was President John Kennedy’s medical doctor and developed the entire field of Myofascial Pain and co-authored the seminal texts on the subject. Dr. Travell became Dr. Ferguson’s mentor and colleague until Dr. Travell’s death in 1997.

Of her various accomplishments, Dr. Ferguson is proudest of the text she co-edited with Robert Gerwin, a neurologist in Bethesda and at Johns Hopkins: Clinical Mastery in the Treatment of Myofascial Pain.  In that text, Dr. Ferguson authored the chapters on Frozen Shoulder and on Hip and Groin Pain and co-authored the chapters on Whiplash neck injuries and Lower back Pain and the chapter on Heel Pain.  For over 15 years she has been a course co-director of a series of  interdisciplinary continuing education courses that focus on teaching the diagnosis and treatment of myofascial pain to health professionals from all over the country including acupuncturists as well as MDs, PAs, NPs, PTs, DCs, Dos, and LMTs.  At this time, she is completing the third article in a series about treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis.

Books or Articles Mentioned

Clinical Mastery in the Treatment of Myofascial Pain

Related Posts

Sharon Sauer on treating the shoulder

David Legge on treating the shoulder

Tom Bisio on treating the shoulder

Anthony Von der Muhll on treating the shoulder

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Acupuncture Training – Sharon Sauer on Treating the Shoulder https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/acupuncture-training-sharon-sauer-on-treating-the-shoulder/ https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/acupuncture-training-sharon-sauer-on-treating-the-shoulder/#comments Sat, 13 Feb 2016 21:14:36 +0000 https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/?p=1222

Trigger point expert Sharon Sauer shares decades of experience on treating the most common type of shoulder pain she sees; pain in the front of the shoulder. She explains how this is commonly caused by trigger points in the infraspinatus muscle, introduces some range of motion tests to help determine if the infraspinatus is the cause, and which part of the infraspinatus is most likely contributing to the pain.

About the Guest

Author and “grandmaster” of trigger points Sharon Sauer runs the Pain Free and Full Function clinic in Chicago Illinois. Sharon Sauer has studied with many of the pioneers in the field of trigger points; Janet Travell, David Simons, and Bonnie Prudden.

Sharon has recently started (Feb. 2nd 2016) a 47 week, entirely free, Bodyworkers Master Course. Visit the link to learn from Sharon from the comfort of your own home!

Books or Articles Mentioned

Trigger Point Therapy for Lower Back Pain

Range of Motion Testing Charts

Guest’s Website

http://www.myopain.com/

Related Posts

David Legge on treating the shoulder

Tom Bisio on treating the shoulder

Anthony Von der Muhll on treating the shoulder

 

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Acupuncture Training: Anthony Von der Muhll on Treating the Shoulder https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/acupuncture-training-anthony-von-der-muhll-on-treating-the-shoulder/ https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/acupuncture-training-anthony-von-der-muhll-on-treating-the-shoulder/#respond Thu, 28 Jan 2016 20:01:19 +0000 https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/?p=1211

In this interview, Anthony shares his great insights on the word Qi and on treating the shoulder. He emphasizes how Qi is a context specific term within a very context specific language. And has fantastic advice on how to treat shoulder problems.

About the Guest

Anthony Von der Muhll L.Ac., DNBAO, FAAPM has served as a Clinical Instructor in the Sports Medicine program at the Five Branches University of TCM since 2005. He is also a Diplomate of the National Board of Acupuncture Orthopedics, a Fellow of the American Academy of Pain Management, and certified as a Personal Trainer through the American College of Sports Medicine. He has over 13 years of clinical experience as a sports massage therapist, physical therapy aide, athletic training assistant, and licensed acupuncturist in multi-disciplinary clinics, including SpineMed Associates and the PRIME Pain Medicine Institute.

Guest’s Website

http://www.aomprofessional.com/

Related Posts

David Legge on treating the shoulder

Tom Bisio on treating the shoulder

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Acupuncture Training – David Legge on Treating the Shoulder https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/acupuncture-training-david-legge-on-treating-the-shoulder/ https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/acupuncture-training-david-legge-on-treating-the-shoulder/#respond Sun, 10 Jan 2016 23:18:01 +0000 https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/?p=1200 davidleggeinterview

I interview David Legge, getting his thoughts on the concept of Qi and his valuable insights on treating the shoulder.

About the Guest

David Legge is an author and senior practitioner of acupuncture. He has made valuable contributions to the field with his books on treating musculoskeletal pain and on elucidating the concept of the Jingjin.

Books by the Guest

Close to the Bone

The Jingjin

Great article on the Jingjin

Guest’s Website

http://sydneycollegepress.com.au/

http://www.theneedleeffect.com/

Related Pages

Acupuncture Training-Tom Bisio on treating the shoulder.

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Acupuncture Haemothorax https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/acupuncture-haemothorax/ https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/acupuncture-haemothorax/#comments Sun, 06 Dec 2015 04:01:45 +0000 https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/?p=1181 heamothorax

 

Another article documenting an adverse effect of acupuncture has come out. This article describes a haemothorax that occured from acupuncture. So what’s the difference between a haemothorax and a pneumothorax? A haemothorax is a collection of blood in the plueral space vs a collection of air in the pleural space. The article mentions electro-acupuncture being used and also “intense manipulation.” The pain started after the intense manipulation, so that seems to be the main suspect. I would assume that during the intense manipulation that was performed at the “elevator scapula,” a blood vessel was repeatedly pierced and damaged. I cover what I consider to be a safe method to target the elevator scapula (aka levator scapula) in my upcoming book. Read the article so you can recognize the danger signs.

Please like, share, and comment below.

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The Spirit of Qi https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/the-spirit-of-qi/ https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/the-spirit-of-qi/#respond Mon, 30 Nov 2015 04:05:42 +0000 https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/?p=1183 Man with conceptual spiritual body art

Recently I heard someone comment that “spirit” is the root word of respire; to breath. Inspire, respire, expire, the root of all these words is the latin spiritus which meant/means breathing, spirit, wind or breeze, energy. Isn’t this weird? This sounds so similar to the idea of the Chinese word Qi.

How about the Greek word pneuma? In ancient Greek philosophy and medicine, pneuma is defined as “Air or an all-pervading fiery essence in the air (which today would be identified with oxygen), which was the creative and animating spirit of the universe; drawn into the body through the lungs, it generated and sustained the innate heat in the left ventricle of the heart and was distributed by the arteries to the brain and all parts of the body.(1)

It’s easy to see the connection between the breath and wind. But spirit? Is that because when people stopped breathing, their “spirit” “left?” They “expired” in more ways than one?

It looks like the idea that breath, energy, and spirit were related was not only common in China, but also in western cultures before the scientific revolution. Is this type of belief typical of “iron age” civilizations? The discovery of oxygen in 1774 called into question the existence of some spiritual animating force in air. Scuba divers can dive with a mix of oxygen and nitrogen or even a mix of oxygen and helium. So it looks like oxygen is the essential component of atmospheric air for humans (although too much oxygen is fatal!). If Qi is necessary for life and one type of Qi comes from the air, can we deduce that that particular Qi is oxygen?

I think some practitioners of Chinese medicine in the west believe that “science” dismisses many of its concepts out of hand. But when we realize that Greek pneuma and Latin spiritus are, for the most part, parallels to Chinese qi, we see that the modern scientific viewpoint has evolved out of very similar beginnings. A belief in an animating vital force and humorism.

Please share this article and add your comments below.

(1) http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/pneuma

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Acupuncture for Satellite Trigger Points https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/acupuncture-for-satellite-trigger-points/ https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/acupuncture-for-satellite-trigger-points/#respond Tue, 20 Oct 2015 04:32:29 +0000 https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/?p=1170 satelliteRecently a colleague and I were discussing a problem that happens sometimes when doing trigger point work. You treat an area that is tight and tender, but the patient doesn’t improve. Or they will improve only temporarily. This is a broad topic but I want to address one aspect of this problem and try to address other aspects of it in other posts. I’m realizing that I need to write a series of posts that address all the basic concepts of trigger points aka ashi points! I’m going a little out of turn because I should probably write about the concept of referred pain patterns first, but in this post I want to address the concept of:

Satellite Trigger Points

The basic concept is that Satellite (or secondary) Trigger Points develop because of the existence of a “primary” problem somewhere else. Usually a “key” trigger point within another muscle or because of radiculopathy. In my opinion, we can make four broad categories of satellite points.

  1. Satellite points that develop within the area of the primary point’s referred pain pattern (and these patterns often follow the Sinew meridians).
  2. Satellite points that develop in a muscle that is an antagonist or synergist of the muscle that harbors the primary trigger point.
  3. Satellite points that develop within muscles that are innervated by a spinal segment that is being impinged (radiculopathy).
  4. Satellite points that develop because of strain caused by the existence of a primary trigger point that changes the patient’s gait, posture, or other movement(s).

To schedule an appointment contact us here or call (530) 403-6386.

Treating Satellite Trigger Points

Treating the primary point(s) may eliminate the satellite point. Especially if the problem is not long standing. The more chronic the problem though, the more likely it becomes that you will have to treat the satellite points themselves.

However, if you focus treatment on the satellite points and miss the primary points, the patient will not get relief of their pain. Or their relief will be short lived (like 24 hours or so) and when it comes back they will be back to “square one.” This is a sign that you need to reevaluate and search for more primary points.

To schedule an appointment contact us here or call (530) 403-6386.

Typical Acupuncture Case Study 1

The patient complains of anterior thigh pain or numbness. You treat the thigh, vastus lateralis and rectus femoris, but they don’t improve. The primary points are in the tensor fasciae latae and the gluteus minimus. When you treat them, the patient gets lasting relief.

To schedule an appointment contact us here or call (530) 403-6386.

Typical Acupuncture Case Study 2

The patient complains of buttock pain. You treat the piriformis, gluteus maximus, and gluteus minimus but they don’t improve. The pain is coming from nerve impingement of the L 4 nerve root. You treat the huo tuo jia ji points and the patient does traction and they improve.

In both of these examples, you could see the exact opposite also!

To schedule an appointment contact us here or call (530) 403-6386.

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A Stitch in Time Saves Nine https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/a-stitch-in-time-saves-nine/ https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/a-stitch-in-time-saves-nine/#respond Tue, 15 Sep 2015 06:47:05 +0000 https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/?p=1158 A Step By Step Guide to Relieving Neck Pain

 Healing neck pain

About a month ago I wrenched my neck! I was laying on my back and had just woken up. I put my hand behind my head to prop it up a bit, planing on lingering in bed for a minute before I got up. With my fist behind my head I just turned my head slightly to the left, just an innocent movement, I’m not even sure why. To look at my cat? As soon as I moved, I heard and felt a terrible tearing feeling deep in my neck at about the left side of C-3. I gasped and was immediately disabled! I had to support my head to get out or into bed and moving my head was impossible. There was one spot between flexion and extension that was the least painful and I did my best to stay there as much as possible. I wanted to detail the treatment I did because I was basically pain free with full mobility within 3 days on an injury that could easily have lingered for weeks or months.

To schedule an appointment contact us here or call (530) 403-6386.

Step 1 Herbs

I began taking “Trauma Pills”. The recipe is in Tom Bisio‘s book A Tooth From the Tiger’s Mouth. I took 1 packet b.i.d. for the first 2 days. Raw Tien Qi capsules (I get mine from Bioessence) 4 t.i.d. After I finished taking the trauma pills I began on Jin Gu Die Da Wan (also from Bioessence) 12 t.i.d.

To schedule an appointment contact us here or call (530) 403-6386.

Step 2 Herbal Plaster

I used Wu Yang Pain Relieving Plasters directly on the injured area.

Step 3 Electro-acupuncture (EA)

I had recently read a journal article that showed that injured rats treated with EA formed less scar tissue than injured rats that did not receive EA. I used 2 needles, one above and one below the injured spot along the BL line one day and then along the GB line the next day.

This protocol was incredibly effective for me. I was basically pain free with full mobility within 3 days when I expected this injury to take months to resolve. I’ve had similar success with other injuries using Trauma Pills and Wu Yang patches. I threw in the EA this time because I was so severely debilitated by the injury, I could hardly move my neck.

To schedule an appointment contact us here or call (530) 403-6386.

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Interview With Tom Bisio on Treating the Shoulder https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/tom-bisio-on-treating-the-shoulder/ https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/tom-bisio-on-treating-the-shoulder/#respond Mon, 24 Aug 2015 17:55:04 +0000 https://www.ashi-acupuncture.com/?p=1149 tom bisio interviewThis is the first in my “Expert’s Interview” series. Tom Bisio author of numerous books including Tooth From a Tiger’s Mouth and Zheng Gu Tui Na: A Chinese Medical Massage Textbook shares his insights on treating shoulder pain with acupuncture and Tui Na, Chinese medical massage. You can learn more about Tom at his websites http://www.zhenggutuina.com/ and http://www.internalartsinternational.com/

 

 

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